PRESS RELEASE

April 2019

Dear Member,

 

The attached was published in the Government Gazette on 02 April 2019.

 

It prescribes the rates at which employers will be assessed in calculating the 2019 annual assessment fee payable to the Compensation Fund (in terms of the Compensation for Occupational Injuries and Diseases Act).

 

2019-coida-rates_

Dear Member,

Please find the latest Tender Bulletin attached for your information and reference.

tender-bulletin-30545-april-2019

 

 

Please find the Nedlac presentation on Eskom for your information.

nedlac-on-eskom-05-march-2019-revised-1

Tshidi Ndebele

     SACCI Communications

     South African Chamber of Commerce and Industry (SACCI)

    Tel: +27 11 446 3800

    Fax: 086 549 2662

    Email: tshidim@sacci.org.za

 

SACCI New Office Address: 18 Hurlingham Road, Illovo

 

March 2019

SACCI press release
Embargo: 11:30 on Wednesday, 13 March 2019

SACCI’s February 2019 trade conditions survey reflected an improvement on January 2019 trading conditions although conditions remained weak. The Trade Activity Index (TAI) for February 2019 measured 35 compared to 30 in January 2019. The seasonally adjusted Trade Activity Index (TAI) improved to 34 – gaining 4 index points, therefore 66% of respondents still experience tight trade conditions in February. The February 2019 TAI was 9 points lower than the February 2018 TAI.
Trade conditions are expected to remain tough over the next few months. The Trade Expectations Index (TEI) for February 2019 at 41 is down by 1 index point from the January 2019 level and well into negative terrain. The TEI is currently 18 points below last year’s February level of 59, which at the time reflected high expectations for trade activity.
Although slightly higher economic growth is expected for 2019, the upcoming elections in May 2019 may add some uncertainty to expectations. Domestic economic conditions are not favourable, and lower global economic growth and global trade difficulties exacerbate already tight trade conditions. Locally, high unemployment, high household debt, increasing risks and cost of energy supply, strikes and work stoppages, and the application of empowerment measures, are among the challenges facing trade.
The sales sub-index remained unchanged at the low level of 35 in February 2019 while the new orders sub-index improved by 4 points to 36. Sales expectations improved marginally in February with the sub-index increasing by one index point to 47. The new orders sub-index on expectations also improved slightly by 2 index points to 44. It appears that respondents experienced difficulties with supplier deliveries in January and February 2019 as the sub-index declined from 42 in December 2018 to 23 and 26 respectively in January and February 2019.
Despite bleak trade conditions, the sales price index rose by 9 index points to 56 with the increase explained by higher price in an effort to remain profitable. Input costs also increased with the sub-index on input prices rising by 9 points to 66 in February 2019. Sales and input prices are expected to rise by 5 and 3 index points respectively over the next six months – implying continued inflationary pressures in the trade environment. A weaker rand and higher fuel and energy prices could negatively impact inflationary prospects.
The employment sub-index recovered from a 15 points decline in January 2019 as the sub-index recorded 35 in February 2019, still reflecting negative employment sentiment. The six-month employment outlook deteriorated further in February with the sub-index declining by 5 points to 33 compared to a decline of 3 index points in January 2019.
Released by the South African Chamber of Commerce and Industry at their offices in Illovo, Johannesburg.
For more information and infographic, see the SACCI website – www.sacci.org.za or contact:
Alan Mukoki SACCI CEO Cell: 082 551 1159
Richard Downing Economist for SACCI Cell: 082 822 5566

The Latest Fuel Price Increase

As South African Chamber of Commerce and Industry, we note the announcement by the Department of Energy that South Africa’s petrol price will rise by 74 cents a litre from Wednesday the 6th of March 2019, while the wholesale price of diesel will increase by up to 93 cents.

We acknowledge that global oil prices and the adverse ZAR/US$ exchange rate are mainly responsible for this price increase. Another fuel price increase is expected from the beginning of April due to tax hikes that come into effect, as announced by the Minister of Finance in his 2019 Budget Speech.

We are concerned that fuel price increases will lead to inflationary pressures to the economy, leading to potential interest rate increases and a further difficult environment for economic growth.

We acknowledge the Government’s efforts to reduce the sharpness of this negative impact by implementing the price increase in stages, with the first 20 cents coming into effect from the beginning of April 2019, and the remaining 9 cents a litre for petrol and 10 c/l for diesel coming into effect in June 2019. However, taken over a period the effect will still be negative.

We urge Government to make every endeavour to trim unnecessary, wasteful and reckless expenditure with an idea to reduce the various levies on the price of fuel.

This cost of energy input is already overtaxed. An economy whose energy input costs keep rising and are not commensurate with economic growth and job creation is bound to hit turbulence.

 

Contact: Mr Alan Mukoki                                                              082 551 1159

     Tshidi Ndebele

     SACCI Communications

     South African Chamber of Commerce and Industry (SACCI)

    Tel: +27 11 446 3800

    Fax: 086 549 2662

    Email: tshidim@sacci.org.za

 

SACCI New Office Address: 18 Hurlingham Road, Illovo

 

 

 

SACCI’s monthly Trade Survey.

SACCI needs to capture your experience in terms of trade conditions. Please click on the link below to participate in SACCI’s monthly Trade Survey.

By clicking on the link below you can share your business’s trade experience.

https://www.surveymonkey.com/r/T5SJ3SK

 

 

 

     Tshidi Ndebele

     SACCI Communications

     South African Chamber of Commerce and Industry (SACCI)

    Tel: +27 11 446 3800

    Fax: 086 549 2662

    Email: tshidim@sacci.org.za

 

SACCI New Office Address: 18 Hurlingham Road, Illovo

 

 

 

 

18 February 2019

NRS 048-9 Electricity Supply – Quality Of Supply: Code Of Practice in terms of the Electricity Regulation Act, 2006 (Act No. 4 Of 2006)

ELECTRICITY SUPPLY —
QUALITY OF SUPPLY
PART 9: CODE OF PRACTICE –
LOAD REDUCTION PRACTICES,
SYSTEM RESTORATION PRACTICES
AND CRITICAL LOAD AND ESSENTIAL
LOAD REQUIREMENTS UNDER POWER
SYSTEM EMERGENCIES

This document is not a South African National Standard

This rationalized user specification is issued by the
Technical Governance Department, Eskom,
on behalf of the
User Group given in the foreword
and is not a standard as contemplated in the Standards Act, 1993 (Act No. 29 of 1993).

Correspondence to be directed to
The Technical Governance Manager
Technical Governance
Eskom
Private Bag X13
Halfway House 1685
Telephone : (011) 651 6830
Fax : (011) 651 6827
E-mail : nrs@eskom.co.za
Website : http://www.nrs.eskom.co.za

NRS 048-9:2017
Foreword
Emergency load reduction is a measure implemented by the System Operator and distribution
control rooms in order to prevent a national, regional or local blackout when system conditions are
such that demand cannot be met by the available power system capacity, or when adequate
reserves required to manage the power system security cannot be maintained without a reduction in
load. Emergency load reduction in this context refers to mandatory measures required over-and above contracted load reduction (demand response), energy conservation schemes, and demand
side management measures as may be in place at the time.
NOTE The power system includes generation, transmission and distribution infrastructure.
Emergency load reduction may take the form of load shedding (time-based interruption of supply to
customers on a rotational basis), mandatory load curtailment (self-reduction by customers in
response to an instruction given by the system operator), load limiting (a limit placed on the current
or power consumed by a customer, typically enabled by smart meter technology), or customer load
switching (remote switching of customer circuits to specific appliances, typically enabled by smart
meter technology or ripple control technology).
Load shedding differs from a blackout in that load shedding is a controlled intervention affecting a
limited number of customers at a time, whilst a blackout happens without warning in an uncontrolled
manner and can affect many (if not all) customers simultaneously for an unpredictable period of
time.
NOTE The media may at times refer to load shedding as “rolling blackouts”. The term load shedding is an internationally accepted engineering terminology for controlled load reduction by interrupting supply to customers on a rotational basis.
Restoration of supply to all customers after a significant system incident or blackout could take days
to weeks. Whilst the order in which supply is restored to individual customers is often dictated by the nature of the incident, the ability to restore supply to essential loads as quickly as possible should form part of the restoration regime. This requires that essential load requirements are provided by customers to power system operators.
This part of NRS 048 was developed to address the need for a national code of practice for real-time
emergency load reduction and restoration of supply after a major system incident.

The code addresses not only the power system requirement (the load reduction required) but how this is done and communicated so as to have the least negative impact on critical infrastructure. This need for such a code arose subsequent to national load shedding undertaken in South Africa in 2008.

To read full story go to .http://www.sacci.org

INVITATION TO COMMENT ON THE NRS 048-9 ELECTRICITY SUPPLY – QUALITY OF SUPPLY: CODE OF PRACTICE IN TERMS OF THE ELECTRICITY REGULATION ACT, 2006 (ACT NO. 4 OF 2006)
The National Energy Regulator of South Africa (NERSA) is a regulatory authority established as a juristic person in terms of section 3 of the National Energy Regulator Act, 2004 (Act No. 40 of 2004). The Energy Regulator’s mandate is to regulate the electricity, piped-gas and petroleum pipelines industries in terms of the Electricity Regulation Act, 2006 (Act No. 4 of 2006), Gas Act, 2001 (Act No. 48 of 2001) and Petroleum Pipelines Act, 2003 (Act No. 60 of 2003).
Stakeholders and members of the public are invited to comment on the NRS 048-9 Electricity Supply – Quality of Supply: Code of Practice – Load reduction practices, system restoration practices, and critical load and essential load requirements under system emergencies in terms of the Electricity Regulation Act, 2006 (Act No. 4 of 2006), as required by the National Energy Regulator Act, 2004 (Act No. 40 of 2004). The abovementioned specification is available on the NERSA website at www.nersa.org.za under ‘Consultation > Electricity > Invitation to comment’.
Written comments must be submitted to the following email address: nrs048-9_comments@nersa.org.za or to Mr Diketso Ratema at diketso.ratema@nersa.org.za, hand-delivered to Kulawula House, 526 Madiba Street, Arcadia, Pretoria or posted to PO Box 40343, Arcadia, 0083, Pretoria, South Africa.
The deadline for the submission of comments is 18 March 2019.

COMMENT AND GET YOUR VOICE HEARD!!!! http://www.nersa.org.za/Admin/Document/Editor/file/Notices/Invitations/Invitation%20to%20comments%20-%20NRS%20048-9%20Electricity%20Supply.pdf

 

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